Info-Marketer’s Stupid Tax…

Some people are just dumb.  Or maybe it’s just that they’re lazy.  Or possibly ignorant.

Sometimes when a new product is launching and I want to get more info about it to see if it’s something I want to promote.  Often, it’s hard to know a lot about a product with today’s vogue pre-launch page being something really mysterious and promising killer results without really telling you anything.

So awhile back I started using Google to help with my research.  I do a site search to see what pages Google knows about.  It’s a quick and easy way to see if there are affiliate pages, alternate landing / squeeze pages, special reports, etc.  It can be surprisingly effective.

By the way, if you don’t know how to do a site search on Google just type in “site:targetdomain.com” in Google and it will show you every page it has indexed.

In the process of doing this I’ve discovered that there are a *lot* of publishers out there with premium content being indexed by Google and available for the world to see and access… if they know about Google site search.

Basically all the stuff they’re selling… free to the world.  Sometimes it’s the sales thank you page… with links to all the content, of course.  Sometimes it’s a premium content signup page… which is funny.  The publisher went to the trouble of protecting the content… and left a trusted signup page exposed to Google.  Dumb.

At first I would email the site owner and let them know their content is exposed to the public.

But it’s so freaking common that I’ve stopped even doing that.

Is your content exposed?

Search your site and find out.  There are a lot of ways to protect it.  Find one and use it… or get comfortable with giving your content away for free.

And to all the info-product publishers who leave their premium content exposed to me… thank you for paying your stupid tax.

6 Comments Info-Marketer’s Stupid Tax…

  1. Taylor

    Absolutely the best way to find the JV blog and look at all the pretty prizes. That’s how I figure out the launch price when they keep claiming they don’t know for sure yet….

    If the G hasn’t indexed it, try Alexa and Yahoo, they show more sometimes.

    Thanks Matt!

  2. Maurice Castle

    Did you have to share that, LOL

    I noticed that usually it’s the crappy products that make this mistake. The polished, high value content is usually well protected.

    Least it’s a way to get a feel many time for what can be expected. Especially with opt ins and freebie reports.

    Guess you exposed the big hole, wonder how many will take a peek. Stupid tax is well deserved in my opinion.

  3. Curt Snow

    Matt, I’ve also found some of these “stupid gurus” out there and have enjoyed their free content, ranging from PDF files to full-blown video courses. It amazes me that some of these guys don’t understand how to password protect their pages or prevent them from being spidered!

  4. Jill

    OK, I have to put my hand up as a dumb marketer! LOL. Actually some time ago I had moved my thank you page for an ebook of mine to a protected folder but forgot to delete or blank out the original download page so there it was sitting wide open in the google index.

    Thanks for the reminder!

  5. Alan

    Matt,

    I too have found a lot of info that very same way. Sometimes I’ll write to the author and let them know about it. I’ve been given some premium info & tools just for making them aware of the situation.

    The method I usually use is a Firefox plugin called SEOpen. What you do is when you’re on a page in the site just right-click your mouse. When the window pops up select SEOpen -> Mass Check -> In Index. This will open up three tabs in Firefox. Google’s, Yahoo’s and MSN’s indexes. From there you can start your cherry picking.

    If you want to find certain types of files you add filetype:XXX after site:targetdomain.com. Examples would be “site:targetdomain.com filetype:pdf” or “site:targetdomain.com filetype:mp3”. Without the quotes, of course.

    You can also find certain words in the index by using inurl:XXX instead of the filetype. Examples would be “site:targetdomain.com inurl:download” or “site:targetdomain.com inurl:thankyou”

    You can even combine filetype and inurl to go deeper.

    There’s a lot more you can do too. Check out O’Reilly’s Google Hacks.

  6. Taylor

    Ha, just used this to see the free report everyone is emailing me about today. Now checking the cool prizes the JVs can win.

    Cool, Shoemoney is in 2nd place and Gauher is in 5th place.

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